Azure, Azure Data Factory, DCAC, Microsoft Technologies

Slides and Video from Building a Regret-free Foundation for your Data Factory Now Available

Last week, Kerry and I delivered a webinar with tips on how to set up your Data Factory. We discussed version control, deployment, naming conventions, parameterization, documentation, and more.

Here’s our agenda from the presentation.

Slide showing top regrets of data factory users: Poor resource organization in Azure
Lack of naming conventions
Inappropriate use of version control
Tedious, manual deployments
No/inconsistent key vault usage
Misunderstanding integration runtimes
Underutilizing parameterization
Lack of comments and documentation
No established pipeline design patterns
List of top regrets from Data Factory users that they wish they had understood from the beginning

If you missed the webinar, you can watch it online now. Just go to the DCAC website, fill in the required fields with your info, and the video will be shown.

If you’d like a copy of the slides, you can download the PDF here. There is a list of helpful links at the end that you may want to check out.

I hope you enjoyed our webinar. Leave me a comment if you have other experiences with ADF where a design or configuration choice you made in the beginning was difficult or tedious to fix later. Help other ADF developers avoid those mistakes.

Data Visualization, DCAC, Microsoft Technologies, Power BI

Power BI for Communication and Marketing

We often focus on deep analysis and insights generated by machine learning when we talk about Power BI these days because it’s super cool and very fancy. But I think it’s important to remember that you can also use Power BI for simple communication of data. As humans, we are hard wired to process visual information faster than text alone. And it’s often more efficient and concise to convey information in a visual rather than text. We can show in one image what it takes paragraphs to describe. Outside of historical analysis and operational reporting, we can use data visualizations as an engaging way to convey simple facts in a communication or marketing effort. Many people do this with infographics.

Visualization can make simple numbers and facts more memorable and engaging. I enjoy using Power BI for this marketing communication purpose, so I made a report about the people I work with at Denny Cherry & Associates Consulting. I knew most of them before I started working at DCAC, so I was already aware that they were exceptional. But now you can see it, too, with our new Power BI report located at https://www.dcac.com/about-us/learn-more-about-us.

Screenshot of the home page of our About DCAC Power BI report

Data is some people’s preferred language. We can use it to discuss specific points as well as broader trends and comparisons. I have a sticker on my laptop that says “Please Talk Data To Me” for a reason. I can make sweeping statements about how my team is full of accomplished consultants, speakers, and authors. But it is much more impactful when you see the numbers: 27 Microsoft MVP awards and 8 VMWare VExpert awards over the years, a combined 113 years of experience with SQL Server, 86% of us having been a user group leader.

My Surface Pro tablet with a "Please Talk Data To Me" sticker on it
My Surface Pro tablet with a “Please Talk Data To Me” sticker on it

And because Power BI is interactive, you get to interact with my report, choosing which categories you want to learn more about. There is also a little guessing game built into the report. (Edit: Although there is currently a Power BI bug that I had to work around, so it’s helpful to know that the answers are limited to values 1-2500). But that is a blog post for another time, and for now you get a hint as to possible answers.) If I had just told you these stats, you might have listened, but you probably would have tuned out.

Our team even had fun browsing the report, seeing our collective achievements, and guessing who provided which answers.

Building the report

It was quick and easy to use Microsoft Forms to gather the data and then dump the responses to Excel. From there, I made a quick Power BI data model and put together my visualizations. The report is embedded on our website using a Publish to Web link. A few people have said they would like to do something similar for their organizations, so I’ll offer a couple of tips:

  1. Make sure the questions you ask aren’t violating any HR rules, and that employees know that some or all questions are optional. For example, I asked personal questions in the Fun Facts section about number of children employees have. This question was optional and our team felt comfortable answering it.
  2. Try to group your questions into categories so you can easily the separate sections and pages like I did. Then you can associate a color with each category.

If you do make something similar, I’d love to see it. Tweet me a link or screenshot at @mmarie.