Conferences, Microsoft Technologies, Power BI

Power Up: Exploring the Power BI Ecosystem, May 27-28

Next week I’m speaking at at the Dynamic Communities Power Up event titled “Exploring the Power BI Ecosystem“. It takes place on May 27 & 28, 2020. This exciting 2-Day virtual event is designed to ensure attendees have a complete view of the Power BI product and surrounding ecosystem, provide expanded knowledge of the core components and showcase the possibilities for continued exploration and innovation.

Sessions during the event are 2.5 hours long, to really give you time to get into a topic. There are healthy 45-minute breaks between sessions to give you time to attend to personal matters. And the sessions are recorded to give you a chance to catch anything you miss. Some sessions, including mine, offer a take-home exercise to help solidify concepts discussed during the session.

I’m presenting Data Visualization and Storytelling on May 28 at 9am EST/1pm UTC. In this session, you will learn how to build eye-catching Power BI reports to support decision making. You will also see the importance and a realistic approach to data storytelling.

The following topics will be showcased through practical examples:

  • Creating beautiful reports: prioritizing your KPIs, playing with colors, grid
  • Choosing the best chart to illustrate your point
  • Introduction to the concept of Data Storytelling
  • Implementing quality checks on your report design
  • Implementing navigation in your report: bookmarks, drill-through, page-report tooltips, interactive Q&A

This training is a paid event, but it’s just $399 for the full 2 days. This training is great if you are a beginner-to-intermediate Power BI user trying to round out your skills across the many areas of the Power BI suite. You can head over to the website to register. I hope to see you there!

Accessibility, Microsoft Technologies, Power BI

Check Out My MBAS Presentation on Power BI Report Accessibility

I had the privilege of working with Tessa Hurr (PM on the Power BI team) on a presentation for the 2020 Microsoft Business Applications Summit (MBAS) about five features in Power BI that increase report accessibility. This 23-minute presentation is almost entirely demos, and only a few slides. While we talk about some features such as alt text and tab order that are primarily used for accessibility purposes, we also talk about how chart titles, header tooltips, and report themes can be used to make your report more accessible.

Presentation slide listing Five Features that Increase Report Accessibility: tab order, chart titles, header tooltips, alt text, and report themes
Slide from the MBAS 2020 session Creating accessible reports in Power BI

The conference was entirely online this year, and you can catch the sessions on demand now. I hope you’ll take some time to watch my session as well as the other great content that came from the conference. You can watch my session on the MBAS website.

Consulting, Data Visualization, Microsoft Technologies, Power BI

Stress Cases and Data Visualization

Times are stressful right now. There is an ongoing pandemic affecting people’s health and livelihoods. Schedules are messed up, kids are home. People who aren’t used to working remotely are fumbling through learning how to work from home. And then there are the normal stresses that aren’t taking a break just because there is a pandemic: arguments with family members, home repairs, student loan debt.

Woman with her head in her hands
Life is stressful right now. It’s ok to not be ok.

I recently read the book Design for Real Life by Eric Meyer and Sara Wachter-Boettcher. I discovered it because I read another book by Sara Wachter-Boettcher, Technically Wrong: Sexist Apps, Biased Algorithms, and Other Threats of Toxic Tech that encourages us to look at the technology around us and consider how it can and has negatively affected people. If you work in analytics or web design, I recommend both books. She approaches design more from the context of user interfaces and web apps, but there is a lot of applicability to data visualization.

What’s a Stress Case?

Design for Real Life encourages us to consider stress cases. The idea behind stress cases is to consider our users as full, complex, sometimes distracted, vulnerable, and stressed-out people. They aren’t just happy personas who always click the right buttons and share all of our knowledge and assumptions.

Certain use cases, often labeled as edge cases, often go unidentified or dismissed as too infrequent. User interface designers, including data visualization designers, need to train ourselves to seek out those stress cases and understand how our design choices affect people in those usage scenarios. This helps us to minimize harm done by our design. But also, as stated in the book,

When we make things for people at their worst, they’ll work that much better when people are at their best.

Design for Real Life

There is a toxic trend in tech that we developers make things for ourselves, valuing the developers and designers over the users. Designing for stress cases helps us change that trend. We need to value our users’ time, understand our biases as designers, and make features that match our users’ priorities. A very applicable part of this for data visualization is to consider all the contexts that usage scenarios might happen.

Stress Cases in Data Visualization

Whether you are designing a visualization to be embedded in an app, included in an online news article, or published in a corporate dashboard, you can design for stress cases.

Let’s think about a corporate HR report built in Power BI that shows a prediction of employee retention. HR and team managers may use this information to help them assign projects or give promotions and raises. This dashboard and the conversation around it may address information related to identity (race, gender, sexual orientation). The use of the dashboard may affect someone’s compensation and job satisfaction.

How can we design for stress cases here?

We should be asking if we have the right (appropriate and validated) data to accomplish our goals, not just using whatever we can get our hands on. We definitely need to consider laws against discrimination that might be applicable to how we use demographic data. We need to consider the cost or harm done if we allow users to see these predictions down to the individual employee rather than an aggregation. And we should always be asking what actions people are taking as a result of using our dashboard. Have we considered any unintended consequences?

We want to use plain, easy to understand language. We want to explain our data sources and (at least high-level) how the predictive algorithm works. And we need to explain how we intend for this dashboard to be used. Basically, we want to be as transparent and easy to understand as possible. This dashboard can affect people’s livelihoods and happiness as well as the operational and financial health of the business. These data points are more than just pretty dots – they are people.

We also want to make sure our dashboard is easy to use. Think about digital affordances. We want it to be clear what happens when someone interacts with it. We can get fancy with bookmarks and editing interactions in a Power BI report. But does our intended user understand what is shown when they click a button that loads a bookmark? Can the intended user easily get what they need? Or do they have to jump through hoops to get to the right page and set the right filters?

Let’s say Sarah is a new manager at an organization that is trying to improve a high attrition rate, and she needs this information for a meeting with her boss and peers. She’s sitting in an online meeting using a 3-year-old tablet with 10 minutes of remaining battery life. Her two-year-old child is running around in the next the room. The group is discussing whether they should let some people go and then try to rebuild their teams. Can Sarah easily pull up the dashboard on her tablet and set the correct filters to see attrition numbers and retention factors for her team while trying to put on a brave face in front of her colleagues as she races against the tablet’s remaining battery time?

Visualizing the Coronavirus

Currently, it seems everyone in the data community wants to visualize the spread of COVID-19. Just look at the Power BI Data Stories Gallery. I get the appeal of using new and relevant data for practice, but consider your audience and the consequences of making it public. Do you trust and understand your data? Have you considered how the chart types and colors you choose can misrepresent the data? Who is it helping for you to publish your visualization out into the world? What message is your visualization sending? Is it unintentionally adding stress for your already stressed-out twitter followers? Most of us are not working with city officials or healthcare practitioners. We are visualizing this “for fun”. People are showing off Power BI/Tableau/D3 skills and not necessarily communicating clearly with purpose.

Your twitter friend/follower Frank is really concerned about the pandemic. His daughter lost her job at a restaurant. He’s worried about lining up projects for the next few months. And his wife is immunocompromised and in a higher risk group for getting COVID-19. He feels scared and helpless.

Your friend Dave is worried about his mother who lives alone a few hours away from him. He is bombarded by messages every day that say older people are more at risk of getting COVID-19. His mom says she is fine, but he wants her to come and stay with him. It’s all he’s thought about all day.

If you know nothing about epidemiology and don’t understand the response from various national, state, and local governments in your data, and you publish your viz with a choropleth (filled) map covered in shades of red, how will that affect Frank and Dave and everyone else who reads it? Did you add value to the COVID-19 conversation, or just increase confusion and fear?

Amanda Makulec published Ten Considerations Before You Create Another Chart About COVID-19 with some good advice, including the following.

To sum it up — #vizresponsibly; which may mean not publishing your visualizations in the public domain at all.

Amanda Makulec

Stress cases can be related to a crisis, mundane technology failures, or just situations that are stressful in the context of the user’s life. If you are visualizing data, remember there are people who may be interacting with our visuals in less than ideal circumstances. We need to design for them as much as for our ideal use cases.

If you have real-life examples of designing for stress cases in data visualization, please share them in the comments or tweet me at @mmarie.

Accessibility, Data Visualization, Power BI

PolicyViz Podcast Episode on Accessibility

I had the pleasure of talking with Jon Schwabish about accessibility in data visualization. The episode was released this week. You can check it out at https://policyviz.com/podcast/episode-169-meagan-longoria/.

Policy Viz
PolicyViz helps you do a better job processing, analyzing, sharing, and presenting your data.

If you’ve never thought about accessibility in data visualization before, here is what I want you to know.

  1. Your explanatory data visualization should be communicating something to your intended audience. You can’t assume people in your intended audience do not have a disability. People with disabilities want to consume data visualizations, too.
  2. We can’t make everything 100% usable for everyone. But that doesn’t mean we should do nothing. Achieving accessibility is a shared responsibility of the tool maker and the visualization designer. There are several things we can do to increase accessibility using any data visualization tool that don’t require much effort. Regardless of the tool you use, you can usually control things like color contrast, keyboard tab/reading order, and removing or replacing jargon.
  3. Accessible design may seem foreign or tedious in the beginning. We tend to design for ourselves because that is the user we understand most. But if we start adding tasks like checking color contrast and setting reading order into our normal design routine, it just becomes habit. Over time, those accessible design habits become easier and more intuitive.

I hope that one day accessible design will just be design. You can be part of that effort, whether you are a professional designer, a database administrator just trying to show some performance statistics, or an analyst putting together a report.

Listen to the podcast for my top 5 things you should do to make your data visualizations more accessible.

Conferences, Data Visualization, Microsoft Technologies, Power BI, SQL Saturday

New Power BI Report Design Pre-Con in 2020

I’m excited to announce that I will be offering a full-day pre-con about Power BI report design in the coming year called Bookmarks, brain pixels, and bar charts: creating effective Power BI reports. For a full session description and prerequisites, please visit the session page.

Screenshot of the eventbrite page for the pre-con at SQLSaturday Austin

I built this pre-con to help people better approach report design as an interdisciplinary activity where we are communicating with humans, not just regurgitating data or putting shiny things on a page. There are many misconceptions out there about report design. Some people see it as just a “data thing” that only developers do. Many BI developers avoid it and try to focus on what they consider to be more “hardcore data” tasks. I often hear from people that they can’t make a good report because they aren’t artistic. This hands-on session will dispel those misconceptions and help you clarify your definition of a good Power BI report. You will see how you can apply some helpful user interface design and cognitive psychology concepts to improve your reports. And you’ll leave with tips, tricks, and a list of helpful resources to use in your future report design endeavours.

Your report design choices should be intentional, not haphazard or just the Power BI defaults. We’ll review guidelines to help you make good design choices and look at good and bad examples. And we’ll spend some time as a group creating a report to implement the concepts we discuss.

Basic familiarity with Power BI is helpful for attendees. If you know how to add a visual to a report page, populate it with data, and change some colors, that’s all you need. If you feel like you lack a good process for report design to ensure your reports are polished and professional, this session will share an approach you can adopt to help accomplish your design and communication goals. If you feel like your reports are luckluster or not well-received by their intended audience, join me to learn some tips to improve. If you are a more experienced report designer and you want to learn some new techniques and see the latest Power BI reporting features, you’ll find that information in this session as well.

So far, I’m scheduled to present this session at two SQLSaturdays in Q1 2020:

SQLSaturday Austin – BI – February 7, 2020. Please register on Eventbrite.

SQLSaturday Chicago – August 14, 2020. Please register on Eventbrite.

SQLSaturday pre-cons are very reasonably priced. This is a great way to get a full day of training on a low budget! I hope to see you in Austin or Chicago.

Accessibility, Microsoft Power Apps, Power BI

Microsoft Can’t Make Your Power BI Reports Accessible Without Your Help

Every once in a while, someone asks a question like “Can Power BI be accessible?” or “Is Power BI WCAG compliant?” It makes me happy when people recognize the need for accessibility in Power BI. (I’ll save the discussion about compliance not automatically ensuring accessibility for another day.) But most people don’t appreciate the answer to either question.

A woman, man, and person in a wheelchair positioned next to the Power BI logo

The answer is that WCAG compliance and accessible design are highly dependent upon the report creator. Microsoft has added many built-in accessibility features such as keyboard navigation, high contrast view, and screen reader compatibility. But they can’t make your report automatically accessible as there are accessibility features requiring configuration by the report designer. We need to set the tab order and alt text and use descriptive chart titles – there is no artificial intelligence to do this for us (yet?). Beyond that, things like color contrast and colorblind-friendly design are almost entirely the responsibility of the report designer.

Accessible design used to be solely the domain of UI developers. But as we democratize analytics to have everyone building reports, we now have to create awareness and a sense of responsibility among Power BI report creators, especially those who don’t consider themselves developers.

There is a similar challenge going on with data security. It used to be that people thought of it as a concern only for the IT department. Now, it is widely accepted that everyone in an organization plays a role in maintaining data security. I hope the same attitude will be widely adopted when it comes to accessibility in data visualization and analytics.

This challenge is present in any low-code environment with users of diverse backgrounds and technical expertise, which means it is relevant to the entire Power Platform and other similar tools. There is a white paper on PowerApps Accessibility Standards and Guidelines that has a great description of the situation.

PowerApps embodies the idea of “democratization of development”—anyone in your organization can quickly and easily create a powerful app and share it broadly. But the app maker has an ethical, and sometimes legal, obligation to support “democratization of usage” as well—any user of your app must be able to use it as it was intended.

Based upon the popularity of the Power Platform, I’d say the democratization of development has been a wild success. But we still have some steps to take to democratize usage. Microsoft is doing their part to make their products accessible and to fix accessibility bugs quickly. Now we need to recognize and honor our obligation to design inclusively.

The Microsoft Docs on accessible report design were recently updated to provide more guidance. I hope you’ll check them out and start implementing the recommendations in your reports.

Accessibility, Conferences, Microsoft Power Apps, Microsoft Technologies, Power BI

I’m Speaking at Microsoft Ignite 2019

I’m happy to be speaking at Microsoft Ignite this year. I have an unconference session and a regular session, both focused on accessibility in the Power Platform.

The regular session, Techniques for accessible report design in Microsoft Power BI, will be Wednesday, November 6 at 2:15pm. In this session I’ll discuss the features available in Power BI for making accessible reports and demonstrate techniques for making your reports easier to use. This session will be recorded, so if you can’t make it to Ignite, you can catch it online.

My unconference session, Accessibility in the Microsoft Power Platform, is a chance to have a discussion about accessibility in Power BI and PowerApps. It will be held on Thursday, November 7 at 10:45 am. Unconference sessions at Ignite include facilitor-led discussion and exercises that encourage audience participation where everyone can share their experiences and opinions. If you will be at Ignite and want to share struggles or successes in improving accessibility or raising awareness of accessibility issues, please join me.

This year at Ignite there is a reservation system for unconferences. You can RSVP while you are building your schedule on the website. Walk-ins will be accepted just before the session, assuming there is room. But please RSVP if you want to be sure to get a seat in an unconference session. Unconference sessions are not recorded, so this will be an in-person session only. But I will post materials through the Ignite website once the session is over.

If you will be at Ignite, please stop by and say hello and meet Artemis the Power BI accessibility aardvark.